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Local nutritionist reveals secrets of Kefir

Registered holistic nutritionist Lisa-Marie Battacharya was not always a healthy eater. “Growing up my mother restricted sugar, so as I got older I rebelled and became a candy and junkfood addict,” says Battacharya.
Lisa-Marie
Lisa-Marie Battacharya holds up a jar of Keffir grains to make water Keffir.

Registered holistic nutritionist Lisa-Marie Battacharya was not always a healthy eater.
“Growing up my mother restricted sugar, so as I got older I rebelled and became a candy and junkfood addict,” says Battacharya. “By the time I was 25, I was suffering from digestive problems, fatigue, and arthritic conditions. When I went travelling, I realized I wanted to turn my life around and be healthy. Upon my return I entered full-bore into a nutrition course.”
Battacharya said with all the stress, she only got sicker, but a few key pieces of advice helped her recover.
“I learned that fermented foods are easier to digest, and also fill-in nutritional gaps that exist in a regular diet,” says Battacharya. “These foods are extremely under-represented in the North American diet.”
Battacharya says her journey with fermented foods started out with Saurkraut and Miso, she also dabbled in Gingerbeer and Kombucha. Two years ago, she discovered water and fruit-based Kefir.
“This drink is so simple to make,” she says, “It’s also very light, and kids love it.”
The mystery surrounding Keffir surrounds the origin of the grains used to make it.
The drink is best known in its dairy form, and is a common traditional staple in Northern and Eastern Europe.
In her Kefir workshops, Battacharya teaches people how to make Keffir and also how to take care of their “babies” (the grains).
Battacharya will be announcing a host of other workshops for this spring, including one on fermenting vegetables. You can follow her on Facebook at Lisa-Marie’s Nutrition, and contact her at lisamarienutrition@gmail.com.